Anyone who has visited Marrakech will probably tell stories of the cats and kittens that inhabit the streets of the ancient medina. Every derb (street) you walk down you see family of cats resting in the shade, a cute kitten lapping up some water or a lone cat sneaking around the corner. Even some of Marrakech’s main tourist attractions – such as El Badi Palace, Saadian Tombs or the Menara Gardens – are inhabited by lots of furry felines.

However, unlike our household friends, the cats of Marrakech are street cats. Although they are fed, watered and cared for by the locals, yet don’t entirely exist as pets in the way we consider cats. (Indeed, our riad staff often give the street cats water and leftovers!!) In this way the Marrakech cats are a lot more independent and more carefree than the cats we know and love.

Just as everywhere in the world, the cats and kittens of Marrakech divide opinion. Some love the cats and find them cute and adorable, while others aren’t so interested and would rather keep their distance. This rule applied for both tourists and locals alike. Yet, due to the independent nature of the cats of Marrakech are not used to attention and will probably shy away from a loving hand. Similarly, if cats aren’t your cup of tea – or rather, your cup of mint tea – then it is quite easy to avoid them.

Ultimately, whatever you think about them, the cats and kittens of the medina are genuine Marrakchi locals and are just one of the many things which makes the red city such a unique and interesting place to visit. Why not book at stay at our luxury riads today?

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Calligraphy, known as Khatt in Arabic, is very much part of the Arab identity. On your trip to Marrakech, you will see that it is all around you: on shop signs, newspapers, books and advertising. It has become a way of communicating through art. We met up with Nour-Eddine Boukheir, a traditionally trained calligrapher, who revealed some of the secrets of this historic artistic practice.


Nour-Eddine Boukheir explained that calligraphy is often still taught in the traditional way; there is a master and pupil relationship. The apprentice learns with the master, who is part of a long line of calligraphers that goes back many centuries. He went on to explain that you first of all have to learn how to write single letters in the major style of script, before you graduate to learning phrases and techniques of joining these letters together. With so much to learn about the use of colour, the type of paper and ink, the marrying of text with theme and the size of lettering, mastering the art of calligraphy becomes a life-long process of discovery and practice.

Although there exists a plethora of regional styles and modern examples, Arabic calligraphy divides down into two main styles – Kufic and Naskh. Kufic is the oldest form of the Arabic script and was developed around the end of the 7th century. Although there are no set rules of using the Kufic script, the style emphasizes rigid and angular strokes. Due to the lack of a singular domineering method, the scripts often vary greatly in different regions and countries, ranging from very square and rigid forms to flowery and decorative.

In contrast, the Naskh script is highly disciplined, with systematic rules and proportions for shaping the letters. Noticeably more cursive and elegant, the Naskh script is perhaps the most ubiquitous style and is used in Qur’ans, official decrees, and private correspondence.

On your trip to Marrakech it is possible to find many examples of beautiful calligraphy: from the carvings at Ben Yousef Medersa, to the inscribed artisanal products offered in the souls, we are sure you will fall in love with this ancient craft.


The Café du Livre is the perfect venue for a quick coffee, a refreshing alcoholic beverage, a light bite or a hearty dinner. By day, Café du Livre is a wonderful place to hang out and relax. To the rear of the café there is an especially comfortable seating area opposite shelves loaded with some 2000 books, both new and second.

The relaxed atmosphere is punctuated by evening of live music and exhibitions. Monday night quiz is a must for young expats. It is easy to see why Café du Livre is becoming somewhat of a Marrakech institution.

The café is located in the heart of Gueliz, tucked away in the Rue Tarik Ben Zaid behind the enormous construction site that used to be the covered market in central Guiliez. It is accessed through the Hotel Toulousain so watch out carefully for signs.

There are a lot of things to do in Marrakech, but sometimes the hot Moroccan sun can take its toll. It is in these moments that even the most hardened traveller requires a café to relax, drink a refreshing drink and maybe even grab something to eat. Situated in Kasbah district, close to the entrance of the Saadian Tombs and the Bab Agnaou and Bab er Robb Medina gates, lies the Kasbak Café. The central location of this café, just a few minutes walk from Dar Habiba, makes it the perfect place to grab a cool beverage or something to drink whilst ticking off that tourist checklist.

Spread across 3 floors including an ample terrace, Kasbah café has a large menu of hot and cold drinks, snacks and meals and, our particular favorite, a wide range of delicious milkshakes made form real ice cream and milk. Delicious.

All around the world Morocco is famous for it’s carpets and many travellers land in Marrakech in search of a quality piece of authentic craftwork. But it is rare to find a carpet seller who sells quality products, at fixed prices, without the tourist-spiel. However, the El Wifak Carpet Cooperative, located in the Ensemble Artisanal in Marrakech’s Medina, is one such place.

Located just a five minute walk from the Koutoubia Mosque and Jemaa el-Fna, the Ensemble Artisanal is the antithesis of the Souks: the atmosphere is relaxed and the prices are fixed, so no haggling!! Whilst looking through the many shops at the Ensemble Artisanal, we stumbled across the El Wifak Carpet Cooperative and were welcomed by Mustapha Alaoui; who happily spent over half an hour with us talking about carpets, the cooperative and his life.


Mustapha told us that he used to work in the government’s department for Artisanal craftwork, checking the quality of carpets and grading them based on various criteria. It quickly became clear that this man had a strong passion for and a large knowledge of traditional Moroccan carpets; a passion and knowledge he was enthusiastic to share. He explained that, the historic isolation of rural communities meant that peoples of different areas developed very individual styles. He continued to explain that El Wifak sold three kinds of carpet: Berber ‘Kilim’ carpets, used for throws, rugs or hung on walls, Tapestry carpets, made from wool and Arabic carpets, also made from wool, which tended to be bigger in size. Where the ‘Kilim’ carpets were made in the Atlas Mountains in Berber villages, both the Tapestry and Arabic carpets are made by the El Wifak Cooperative.


El Wifak, Arabic for sharing equally or a group of people in agreement, consists of around 70 women who make the carpets sold in the shop. (Traditionally, in Morocco, women make carpets and pottery whilst Men make jewelry and metal utensils.) The most important this about the cooperative is that everyone profits from all these sales are shared equally and everyone benefits. So, if you are looking for a quality product from a reputable source, if you are looking for an ethically sourced souvenir, or even if you are just put off by haggling in the Souks then this is the place for you.

The Ensemble Artisanal and the El Wifak Cooperative is located at the start (or the end, depending which way round you walk) of the ‘Needle and Thread’ Medina Walk available for free MarrakechRiad app. If you would like to find out more about the free MarrakechRiad app, the ‘Woodworking’ walk or any of our other Medina walks then our Riad staff would be happy to help.



Once you have followed the small sign off Rue Mouassine, worked your way through the alleyways and knocked on the almost anonymous door to be let in, you are greeted with a warm welcome and an amazing interior.

Dar Cherifa can be found in one of the oldest Riads in Marrakech, dating back to the Saadian times. It has recently been lovingly restored by Abdelatif Ben Abdellah, one of the key figures behind the rejuvenation of the Medina. One thing that firsts strikes you about Dar Cherifa is the incredible use of space: there is a mix of bare untouched walls and original craftsmanship, with a unique centerpiece that hangs above the Riad before the blue Moroccan sky. Alongside some of the best Arabic architecture in Marrakech, the art itself is equally unique and is of a very high standard. Yet, unlike the larger contemporary galleries around the world, the fact that Dar Cherifa focuses on local talent makes it all the more unique.

dar cherifa

Although the price of the artwork on display cost a fair bit more than your average postcard and probably won’t make it onto your souvenir list, the food and drink is very reasonably priced and we were given space, time and freedom to look round the gallery at our own leisure. Dar Cherifa is a space of culture that is accessible for everyone, well worth a visit.

Thousands of worshippers rose early today, Tuesday 29th of July, for the first day of Eid-el-Fitr to attend morning prayers. Eid, to use the shortened more common name, is a three-day festival that marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. In Marrakech, the morning prayers on Eid happen all over the city in Mosques, communal spaces and, less frequently, at home. We were encouraged by local Marrakchis to come to watch the prayers that occurred in an area that runs alongside the Agdal garden, just beyond the Medina Ramparts, a short walk from Bab Agnaou and Bab er Rob. This required an early 6am start, but the experience was undoubtedly worth it. The Route d’Ourika – a wide, usually deserted road that leads to the expanse of land used for the morning prayers – was full of local Muslims, of all ages and backgrounds, a whole community coming together in celebration. The sight was truly heartwarming.

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Watching the morning prayers was a truly spectacular moment; the mid-prayer silence combined with the fresh morning air and low-lying sun to create an unforgettable sublime moment. Although all the locals warmly welcomed us, we decided to keep our distance from the actual event and observed the event from afar. Yet the whole event was truly magnificent, if you are luck enough to be in Marrakech during the next Eid celebrations, we strongly advise you to take this unique opportunity to observe Islam at such a significant time in the year. However, although we were told that everyone would be more than happy to take photos, it is important to be respectful and remember that this is a religious event.

Eid Mubarak everyone, hope you have a great few days!

Whilst walking around Marrakech, it is impossible not to notice how many of the doors, window shutters and wooden tables are carefully adorned with exquisite carvings or intricately painted tessellated patterns. These humble items extend far beyond their functional use: the beautiful designs, that are so unique to the region, represent a certain respect for traditional design and artisanal techniques that is prevalent throughout society.


Where it is easy to find small stalls in the Souks inhabited by skilled workers making beautiful wooden item like small boxes or chess sets, items that are perfect for souvenirs, it is perhaps more difficult to find the workshops that make the larger items like the Riad doors, the carved wooden panelling and so on. Located a short walk form the Jemaa el-Fna square, just metres away from Dar Habiba we found Abdil’s workshop. Abdil, a quiet man of little words, invited us into his space to show us his work: we looked through a series of beautifully painted panels that he uses as samples to demonstrate his work to clients before he showed us a carved doorframe he was currently working on for a Riad renovation. He explained that he mainly works for local businesses, but he has in the past also worked for visitors to Marrakech who wanted to take home a unique item to furnish their house. Perhaps you will need more than the basic hand luggage allowance to take home such an item, but a custom-made piece of artisanal history would maybe be the greatest souvenir of all.

Abdil’s shop is located just off the ‘Woodworking’ Medina Walk on the free MarrakechRiad app; but it is well worth the detour, especially if you are interested in bringing home a special memory of Morocco. If you would like to find out more about the free MarrakechRiad app, the ‘Woodworking’ walk or any of our other Medina walks then our Riad staff would be happy to help.

Storyteller of Jemaa El-Fnaa

The tradition of storytelling is a Moroccan practice which has been taking place in the central square of Marrakech for many hundreds of years. Much like snake charming, acrobatics and copper working, good storytelling is a revered art which demands natural talent as well as many years of practice.

Across the corners of Morocco, storytelling or ‘Hakawti’ in Darija Arabic fuses comedy, music and local news. In Jemaa el-Fnaa, the beating heart of the red city, two renowned storytellers and friends Abdelilah Amal and Mostafa Dardak have been enthralling the crowds of the square for over 25 years.

Abdelilah and Mostafa use a tambour and a flute to add a musical layer to their storytelling, as well as performing some basic acrobatics dressed as clowns to keep the crowd on their feet! Abelilah and Mostafa’s stories are all in the Moroccan Darija form of Arabic, so the guardian of the Riad Dar Habiba kindly helped to translate their tales, which ranged from the arisen difficulties of the amount of languages spoken in the red city to local mishaps in the square.

You can find the two storytellers between the third call to prayer ‘Al Aser’ and the fourth ‘Al Maghreb’ as they showcase their performance in the square for exactly three hours. This is the ideal time for the Marrakshi locals looking to break the days and routine and keep up to date with the chatter and buzz of the Jemaa el-Fnaa. 

Abdelilah and Mostafa’s popularity throughout Marrakech has led them to be asked to participate in television programs such as ‘Alhalka’ on the Medi1 channel, as well as a variety of festivals and comedy shows across the red city.

It’s impossible to know what to expect from Jemaa el-Fnaa, a five minute stroll through it’s centre can have you encountering anything from bird trainers to storytellers like Abdelilah and Mostafa. Create your own story by exploring the red city through the comfort and tranquillity of a Hotel Riad today.


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The Medina Mosque overlooking the Marrakech central square at dusk

Overshadowing the central square of Marrakech is the stunning sight of the Medina, or Argana Mosque. Hugging the North-Western reaches of the Jemaa el-Fnaa aside of Souk Jdid, the Argana Mosque has no Qur’anic school and exists solely as a space of prayer, acting as a key religious location for local Marrakshi, especially during the holy month of Ramadan. As the sun sets over the red city and the smoke from the Jemaa el-Fnaa food markets forms a sultry haze over the square, the sight of the Argana Mosque can still always be seen as it’s highest reaches soar over the movement below. The luxury Hotel Riad Dar Habiba is but a few minutes walk from the thriving centre of activity that is Jemaa el-Fnaa, explore the magic of Marrakech for yourself today. Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map » Explore the Jemaa

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el Fnaa Map

Mens  Djellaba

New fashions come and go through the red city of Marrakech, yet there is one piece of clothing with has stayed for centuries, this is the traditional Moroccan Djellaba. Worn by both men and women, you can expect to see Djellabas worn on a day to day to basis in the streets of the red city and also at religious ceremonies, parties and weddings. Mens Djellaba The Djellaba has a history that traces back to Berber traditions of clothing, and is worn in different styles and variations across the Maghreb region of North Africa. As well as being ceremonial, the long, loose fitting robe has a practical design which protects the wearer from strong desert winds as well as the icy climes of the mountain regions across Morocco and Algeria. In Morocco, the exact style and design of the Djelleba differs from city to city. In Fes for example, the robe takes on the iconic design of a flowing white garment, whereas in Marrakech the Aboallouia style of Djelleba is preferred, which favours broader shoulders and a shorter hood. Womens DjellabaThe female design of the Djelleba perhaps sees the

greatest range of stylistic variation, where alterations between the colours, patterns and sleeve length are vast. From the local culinary delicacies to the world of fashion, Marrakech is a corner of the globe with a rich and vivid cultural identity. Explore the magic of the red city for yourself through the luxury and comfort of a Hotel Riad in the heart of the Marrakech Medina.about he Moroccan people. Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map » Explore the Jemaa el Fnaa Map


There are a number of key religious celebrations that take place in Morocco, the exact dates of which constantly change in keeping with the Islamic calender which follows the lunar cycle.

One such celebration is Eid al-Mawlid an-Nabawī (the festival of the birth of the prophet Mohammed) which takes place in Rabi’ al-awwal, the third month of the Islamic calender. The exact nature of the celebrations differ in various corners of Morocco, but in the red city of Marrakech the festival is honoured by locals visiting holy shrines to ask for blessings, and also to give offerings to those worse off within community.

Traditional sweets, cakes and cookies are made by families and distributed, and new clothing for children is purchased. Adults also spend a portion of the day at local mosque’s, reciting poems and prayer.

One custom which some locals practice in the city is the crafting of fans, it is believed by a few that the day of the prophet Mohammed’s birth was exceptionally windy, and this tradition commemorates that.


As the festival draws to a close, families cluster across the leafy shades of the Menara Gardens to the modern parks of Gueliz and all the public spaces in-between to round off the days celebration with a picnic. Which is often accompanied by the dish Tanjia, a culinary delicacy unique to Marrakech.


During festivals such as Eid al-Mawlid an-Nabawī, Marrakech becomes even more charged with life and movement than usual. Experience the astounding culture of the red city for yourself today, through the comfort of a luxury Riad Hotel in the very heart of the Marrakech Medina.

Two young men boxing in the Jemaa el-Fnaa Square, Marrakech

For many hundreds of years, the Jemaa el-Fnaa square of Marrakech has played host to a wide range of markets, a plethora of unimaginable spectacles and all forms of entertainment imaginable. Indeed, in the red city today, very little has changed. A short stroll through Marrakech’s central square could involve an encounter with anything from a Berber snake charmer to a boxing match.

This is not an exaggeration. If you journey to the very centre of the square you will find Hassan Kata, a boxing pioneer who has been active in Marrakech since the 1980’s and has become something of a local celebrity in the red city.

Hassan organises a boxing ring of spectators in the square, encouraging volunteers from the crowd to try their hand at the sport, supplying them with boxing gloves and acting as the resident referee whilst rallying the crowds of Jemaa el-Fnaa to get behind the boxers.. Spars only take place after the third daily prayer and last a maximum of fifteen minutes, so viewing this unique event is a case of being in the right place at the right time.

However, Hassan Kata’s boxing matches aren’t exactly comparable to Brad Pitt’s Fight Club. Nobody walks away from the ring injured as Hassan Kata’s matches are not the real thing, but rather a spectacle that celebrates the sport of boxing which which has a long and illustrious history in Morocco.

This is just one example of the many secrets Marrakech has to offer. So, why not explore the ancient central square of Marrakech for yourself through the luxury and convenience of a Hotel Riad in the centre of the red city.

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If you step out of the doors of the Riad Cinnamon and stroll past the Ben Youssef mosque, you will encounter the numerous scarf stalls that line the walls in the direction of Souk Semmarine.
The stalls showcase kaleidoscopic arrangements of vivid colours and patterning,
the likes of which can not be found in the city market districts of Europe. Most of the scarves are locally sourced from near Marrakech, however some salesmen choose to import from Turkey, Iran and Pakistan.
And as well as being a fashion accessory, scarves offer protection against the often harsh conditions of the Moroccan climate and have been a fundamental aspect of Islamic identity in Morocco for many hundreds of years.
The scarves on offer in this district of Marrakech are all of the highest calibre of quality and are very reasonably priced, ranging from prices of 20 (£1.47) to 120 (£8.83) Moroccan dirhams depending on the size and design.
An authentic Moroccan scarf is an accessory that’s truly unique to this corner of the globe, explore the magic of Marrakech through the comfort of a luxury Riad Hotel for yourself, and take a piece of Morocco home with you.

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In the North-Eastern reaches of the ancient central square of Marrakech between Souk Semmarine and Café de France you will discover Souk el Bahja.

Meaning literally ‘up and down’ in the Moroccan Darija dialect of Arabic, Souk el Bahja gets its name from the three floors of iron stairs that allow you to traverse through the labyrinthine market district.

Babouche from Souk el Bahja, Marrakech

Souk el Bahja is ancient and traditional market district which specialises in female clothing and jewellery. Everything from bracelets to wedding rings can be found here, and the vast amount of jewellery on offer has earned the Souk the nickname the ‘place of lovers’ amongst locals.

Lose yourself in Souk el Bahja and the many others like it on a trip to the red city today by staying in any one of our four luxury Riad Hotels, all located in the very heart of the Marrakech Medina.

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Bird trainer, Jemaa El-fna Marrakech

At the very centre of Marrakech is Jemaa el-Fnaa. For hundreds of years this central square has acted as the beating heart and mouthpiece of the red city, and is home to markets, food stalls and street performers of a huge variety.

One individual you might expect to encounter in the square is Ba Mahjoub the bird trainer. Ba can be found close to Rue Jamaa Kharbouch and Café de France, encircled by his birds who pace calmly around him despite the roaring twenty four hour bustle of the square.


Ba’s birds are named Voyageur, Khaloui, Nhassi, Berouita and Taousi and for many years he is trained them and others similar to respond to his commands through a series of simple gestures, claps and whistles.

Ba Mahjoub is renowned throughout the square for being able to make his birds soar onto the terraces of any one of the large café restaurants that hug the perimeters of Jemaa el-Fnaa square, only to recall them in an instant.

Explore the mysterious world of the red city of Morocco for yourself today through the comfort of our luxury Riad Hotels, all located within a few minutes stroll from Marrakech’s central square.

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Marrakech Mirror Market - Header-1

Snugly located by the main entrance of the Souk Ouarzazi and the Bab Ftouh arch is the Marrakech market of mirrors. Built like a miniature square, the tiny shops of the mirror market hug the corners around it’s centre in close proximity, giving the space a warm and intimate feel.

The mirrors found here takes on a huge variety of different forms and styles. You’ll find craftsmen using ancient Berber techniques to hand-chisel frames out of wood, alongside contemporary Moroccan-Arabic designs that favour tin, silver and copper as materials which are all shaped and decorated by hand. 

The mirrors that deck the halls of our luxury Riad Hotels, as well as many others throughout the red city of Marrakech are all sourced from the mirror markets and others like it.

The skills used to create the mirrors of the red cities markets are wrought with secrecy and passed down through families, generation after generation. So you can be sure that a purchase made here for a loved one back home will be truly unique in it’s nature.

Explore the magic of the Marrakech mirror market through the comfort of a luxury Riad Hotel today.

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Rue Moulay Rachid or L’Prince as local Marrakshi call it, stretches from the reaches of the hotel Grand Tazi to the Café Grand Terrace. You will discover L’Prince to be a thriving area of the red city, where the huge of variety of shops, restaurants and café’s keep the district humming with activity all through the day.

An abundance of banks and bureau de change’s also make L’Prince an ideal place to draw out or exchange money, and you’ll find the financial institutions in this district will accommodate numerous currencies from around the globe. 

By nightfall, the district takes on a very different appearance. As the restaurants and clothes shops slide down their shutters, the pavements flood with the activity of the cities street salesmen. If you take a stroll down L’Prince at this time you’ll find your path lit by the glow of hundreds of Moroccan tin lamps, an astonishing spectacle truly unique to this corner of the world.


L’Prince, and many other districts like it are all walking distance from any one of our luxury Hotel Riads. Book now and discover the magic of Morocco. 

. or L’Prince as local Marrakshi call it, stretches from the reaches of the hotel Grand Tazi to the Café Grand Terrace. You will discover …. to be a thriving area of the red city, where the huge of variety of shops, restaurants and café’s keep the district humming with activity all through the day.

An abundance of banks and bureau de change’s also make L’Prince an ideal place to draw out or exchange money, and you’ll find the financial institutions in this district will accommodate numerous currencies from around the globe. 

Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map

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During the chilly winters of Marrakech, where the temperature drops from 40°C Summer highs to below 8°C, there is one Moroccan delicacy that you will see on almost every dinner table, this is Harira soup.

Any local Marrakshi will tell you that the best harira soup is home-made, usually consisting of flour, lentils, cermicelli, beans, tomatoes and occasionally meat balls. The ingredients to Harira can often change depending on which corner of Morocco it’s being made, but it’s nearly always fragrantly seasoned with pepper, ginger and cinnamon.

There is a tradition within the communities of Marrakech whereupon the ingredients for Harira are always purchased after the day of work and before the start of the evening.

In a corner of the Dar Habiba district, there lives an old woman named Fatima and her daughter. Every day Fatima sells more than 150 bowls of harira soup, served with traditional Moroccan bread and eggs.

Harira soup is available at most restaurants and open air stalls in Marrakech, explore the red city and Moroccan cuisine today in one of our luxury Hotel Riads.


About 30 kilometres to the South of the red city of Marrakech in the direction of Lalla Takerkoust lake, a small festival takes place in memory of the saint Moulay Abdellah Ben Hussain. This festival is called the Tamaslouht Musem (festival) and Tbourida (fantasia) and it occurs on the last week of January.

On the first day or Tamaslouht, occurs the Tbourida, or fantasia. This is where the various clans of Marrakech have the opportunity to compete against each other using Berber horses, which are known throughout Morocco for their strength and beauty.


The competition determines the strength of the relationship between rider and horse, and the coordination skills of a score of riders representing a clan. The riders leader, called a Cheikh or Kaid is responsible for organising the clan into a circular ring (called a Serba) and instructing them to watch carefully for his signal once the competition begins.

When the competition is in full effect, the riders must be ready at a moments notice to recognise the

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Kaid’s secret signal, so that they can rally their horses shoot the gunpowder they use (called Baroud) into the air in complete unison.

Both rider and horse don the colours and style of their respective tribes, and where in centuries past these competitions were engaged with only by men, in modern times women too are allowed to try their hand.


After the first day of Tbourida draws to a close, festival goers then join the Musem, involving children’s games and circus acrobatics. Another important feature that plays into effect over the course of the four days is the trance-like music of Gnawa and Issawa, which is played ritually throughout the Musem. This music is intended to incite a spiritual and calming atmosphere, whereupon festival goers can invoke the blessing of the saint Moulay Abdellah Ben Hussain.

The Tamaslouht Musem and Tbourida festival, and many others like it are commonplace in the ancient city of Marrakech. Explore the red city today in one of our luxury Riad Hotels.


In the hustle and bustle of Marrakech’s central square, you can find everything from snake charmers to magicians. That’s not to say that Jemaa el-Fnaa is a space strictly for the weird and the wonderful, one public game that you will find being played day or night by tourists and locals alike is ‘chasing lemonade’.

The game costs but 5 dirhams (£0.37) to play,  consists of being able to loop a hook tied to a long piece of bamboo round the top of various bottles of lemonades and cola. Though it seems easy, it of course is not! Not many pass through Jemaa el-Fnaa with the patience and coordination to walk away a winner.

The creator and invigilator of the game Badr, explains how he believes that the game can act as a test of the psychological well being of the player. He says that if a contestant is “truly at peace” with his surroundings, he will gain where the opposition loses.

Jemaa el-Fnaa is the beating heart of the red city of Marrakech, and is but walking distance from any one of our luxury Riad Hotels.

Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map

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A short stroll through the winding labyrinthine streets of the red city of Marrakech will lead you to encounter a huge variety of traditional street foods being sold.

One such dish is moul seikok, a fusion of steamed semolina seeds and milk. If you are strolling through one of Marrakech’s many souks, you may hear the seikok salesmen as they cruise along the streets on their motorbikes selling their food to the workers of the markets.

At only 3 Moroccan dirhams (£0.20) a bowl, you would be mad not to try a bowl of this delicacy, and you will find the salesmen themselves to be delighted if you take an interest in the local cuisine that isn’t directly aimed at tourists.

The famous souk districts of Marrakech are all within a short walking distance from any one of our luxury hotel Riads. 

Holistic remedies from the desert, Morocco

If you take a short stroll through the central square of Marrakech (known as Jemaa el-Fnaa) you will encounter all kinds of spices, herbs and medicinal products, many of which are made from the unique commodity of the Argan nut. Located in the Eastern corner of the square however, is an area dedicated to showcasing a range of holistic remedies from the Sub-Saharan deserts of Southern Morocco. It is very common for desert remedies like the ones displayed here to be the first port of call for to treat a variety of ailments such as flu, rheumatic fever and eczema. If you explore this sleepy section of the square

you will discover that as well as holistic treatments, there are a large selection of cosmetic products for sale also. Stall vendors sell everything from lipstick to perfume, of which are all prepared from plants and herbs plucked from the wild desert. Other products which are unique to this corner of the world such as kohl (a form of mascara which has been used in North Africa for over 5000 years) can also be found. In other parts of Africa and also India, kohl is applied on children to deter the gaze of the evil eye. Another unique commodity you will find on offer is Ashabba. This is a remedy that is said to heal all kinds of sexual dilemma’s, made from herbs and the fat of camels from the south. The bustling square of Jemaa el-Fnaa is but a short walk from any one of our luxury Riad Hotels, explore the secrets that Marrakech has to offer today. Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map » Explore the Jemaa el Fnaa Map


Photo: J Schalkwijk

Just East of the central square of Marrakech, standing between the Dabachi and Riad Zitun Jdid districts is the Kennaria quarter. No one is quite sure where the name of the quarter originates from, some say from the canary bird, others the canary cactus and the rest say it’s possible that the canaries islands off the West coast of Morocco could be the origin for this ancient corner of Marrakech which first came to be during the Mowahad dynasty in the 14th century.

As with many areas of the ancient city of Marrakech, the Kennaria district is rich with folklore on the origins of its inception. It’s said that the architectural style of the Kennaria area is the result of a friendship between a Mowahad King named Yaacub Almansour and his doctor, Abou Baker Ibn Zohr.

Abou Baker Ibn Zohr is said to served the king faithfully for many years, but dearly missed his former home of Seville, Spain. In his melancholy the doctor wrote a poem that hinted towards his longing for the paved streets of Seville, and after reading it the king responded by asking local architects to redesign the Kennaria quarter with similar characteristics to the Spanish city that he so sorely missed.

So the architects and masons built several hammam’s, bakeries and houses in the Andalusian style that the doctor was accustomed to, using equipment and materials brought from Seville, across the Alboran sea to Marrakech. The tale goes that Abou Baker Ibn Zohr was so astonished upon witnessing the district after it’s remodelling, that for a time afterwards he believed he was in a dream.

In modern times the district is home to a high number of artisanal shops, and is notorious for having more hammam’s (both traditional and modern) than any other sector of Marrakech. Though much has changed in the Kennaria quarter over the centuries, some features of the districts architectural relationship with Andalusia do remain.

The Kennaria quarter, and many other districts which share the same rich historical past are a short walk from any one of our luxury Riad Hotels, explore Marrakech today!

Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map

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The Arsat gardens of Marrakech

‘Arsat’ is a term coined by the 19th century writer and Islamic scholar Hocine El Yamani, it’s meaning is to indicate the urban spaces which were cultivated and transformed into botanical gardens by the order of the kings of the Alaouite dynasty.

These gardens have held a key significance in Moroccan culture for many centuries, from acting as a space in which to debate local political matters to being a location in which families and friends can organise a N’zaha (a picnic ritual involving tanjia, tea and Marrakshi songs).

As the gardens sprung up in the times of the Alaouites, they took on the names of individuals of significance, such as Arsat Moulay, Arsat Salam, Arsat Ghandafi, Arsat Naciri, Arsat Louarzazi in the red city of Marrakech. Other times however, the gardens take on the names of particular fruits that grow amongst their leaves, such as Arset Zitoun (olives), Arsat Lhamed (lemon), Arsat Nkhel (palms) and Arsat Limoun (orange).

The notion of the Arsat can mean a variety of things for different people, but one unifying feature is that the gardens are a space of serenity and of harmony. Our luxury Riad Hotels are but a short walk from any one of the Arsat botanical gardens scattered across the red city of Marrakech.

Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map

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Like many areas of the red city of Marrakech, the Mouassine district has a history spanning hundreds of years. Previously called Houmat Abi Abidan, the name for this well-known part of the city came to be called Mouassine at some point in the 16th century after a large clan of Jewish settlers came to the area.

‘Mass’ meaning dagger and ‘ssine’ meaning two are words that originate from the Berber language, and they came to be the name of this famous district because the clan that made Mouassine their home were highly skilled craftsmen, with a particular skill for forging daggers.

After the clan established themselves, Mouassine became a thriving souk district, and a hugely significant half-way point for goods coming from the North of Morocco to the Sub-Saharan cities to the south.

The district of Mouassine remains charged with trade, commerce and activity to this very day, and the impact of centuries of activity in the area has meant that it has become a popular site for poets as well as craftsmen.

Today if you take a stroll through Mouassine, you’ll find a huge variety of stalls selling traditional Moroccan commodities alongside modern restaurant’s such as Café Arab and the Bougainville.

Mouassine, and many other famous districts of Marrakech are but a short stroll from any one of our luxury Hotel Riads, discover the magic of Marrakech for yourself today.

If you stroll through the winding streets nearby Rue Riad Zitoun el Kdim and the Riad Dar Habiba, you may be lucky enough to spot Hamza.

Hamza is a street cleaner by his daily trade, however he also has a burning passion for the dance moves inspired by Charlie Chaplin!

He’s somewhat of a celebrity among the locals in this sleepy residential area and I was lucky enough to get this one-off show!

Marrakech Jemaa al Fnaa Map

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